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Theodore W. Allen, "Class Struggle and the Origin of Racial Slavery: The Invention of the White Race," 1975

July 31, 2011


“…The plantation bourgeoisie established a system of social control by the institutionalization of the ‘white’ race whereby the mass of poor whites was alienated from the black proletariat and enlisted as enforcers of bourgeois power.”

--Theodore W. Allen--
-- "Class Struggle and the Origin of Racial Slavery: The Invention of the White Race," 1975 --

From Jeffrey B. Perry, “The Developing Conjuncture and Some Insights From Hubert Harrison and Theodore W. Allen On the Centrality of the Fight Against White Supremacy” (120 pp., forthcoming online by August 23, 2011, at http://clogic.eserver.org/2010/Perry.pdf )]

Theodore W. Allen, from "The Invention of the White Race," vol. 1

July 30, 2011



“ . . . the record indicates that laboring-class European-Americans in the continental plantation colonies showed little interest in ‘white identity’ before the institution of the system of ‘race’ privileges at the end of the seventeenth century.”

--Theodore W. Allen--
--"The Invention of the White Race," Vol. 1, 1994--

Lerone Bennett Jr., "The Shaping of Black America" -- ch. 3 "The Road Not Taken"

July 29, 2011

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“Back there, before Jim Crow, before the invention of the . . . white man, and the words or concepts to describe them, the Colonial population consisted largely of a great mass of . . . [European American and African American] bondsmen, who occupied roughly the same economic category and were treated with equal contempt by the lords of the plantation and legislatures. Curiously unconcerned about their color, these people worked together and relaxed together. They had essentially the same interests, the same aspirations, and the same grievances. They conspired together and waged a common struggle against their common enemy – the big planter apparatus and a social system that legalized terror against . . . bondsmen. No one says and no one believes it was a Garden of Eden in Colonial America. But, the available evidence . . . suggests that there were widening bonds of solidarity . . . And the same evidence indicates that it proved very difficult indeed to teach white people to worship their skin.”

Lerone Bennett Jr.
The Shaping of Black America, Chapter 3, “The Road Not Taken,” 1975

Theodore W. Allen, "Class Struggle and the Origin of Racial Slavery: The Invention of the White Race"

July 29, 2011

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“In the latter half of the seventeenth century, [in] Virginia and Maryland, the tobacco colonies . . . Afro-American and European-American proletarians made common cause in this struggle to an extent never duplicated in the three hundred years since.”
Theodore W. Allen
"Class Struggle and the Origin of Racial Slavery: The Invention of the White Race," 1975

[From Jeffrey B. Perry, “The Developing Conjuncture and Some Insights From Hubert Harrison and Theodore W. Allen On the Centrality of the Fight Against White Supremacy” (120 pp., forthcoming online)]

Theodore W. Allen, "The Invention of the White Race"

July 27, 2011

“When the first Africans arrived in Virginia in 1619, there were no ‘white’ people there; nor, according to the colonial records, would there be for another sixty years.
--Theodore W. Allen--
--"The Invention of the White Race," Vol. 1, 1994--

(This statement is based on the fact that, after twenty-plus years of meticulous research and examination of 885 county-years of pattern-setting Virginia’s colonial records, Allen found “no instance of the official use of the word ‘white’ as a token of social status” prior to 1691.")

[From Jeffrey B. Perry, “The Developing Conjuncture and Some Insights From Hubert Harrison and Theodore W. Allen On the Centrality of the Fight Against White Supremacy” (forthcoming)]

Hubert Harrison, "World Problems of Race"

July 26, 2011

“The King James version of the Bible . . . does not contain the word ‘race’ in our modern sense . . . as late as 1611 our modern idea of race had not yet arisen.”
-- Hubert Harrison, “World Problems of Race,” 1926

[From “The Developing Conjuncture and Some Insights From Hubert Harrison and Theodore W. Allen On the Centrality of the Fight Against White Supremacy” (forthcoming)]

"Rediscovering Hubert Harrison: Revolutionary Socialism and Anti-White-Supremacy for Twenty-First Century America" a review by Charles L. Lumpkins of "Hubert Harrison: The Voice of Harlem Radicalism, 1883-1918" from "Socialism and Democracy," March 2011.

July 4, 2011

Tags: Rediscovering Hubert Harrison: Revolutionary Socialism and Anti-White-Supremacy for Twenty-First Century America, Charles L. Lumpkins, Jeffrey B. Perry, Socialism and Democracy

"A free thinking race conscious and class-conscious black working class socialist, Hubert Harrison (1883–1927) exerted profound influence among leading intellectual activists in the civil rights, New Negro, Black Nationalist, labor, and socialist movements mainly in Harlem, New York City. Harrison was a dynamic speaker, prolific writer, labor and community organizer, bibliophile, street corner orator, educator, newspaper publisher, advocate of women’s rights, and propagandist. From the late 1900s into the 1920s, he captured the attention of, and in some cases interacted with, numerous prominent individuals including Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Du Bois, Eugene Debs, Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, “Big Bill” Haywood, Chandler Owen, Cyril V. Briggs, Marcus Garvey, and Henry Miller. He earned the sobriquet “Father of Harlem Radicalism” from labor leader and socialist Asa Philip Randolph, and he received praise from Joel A. Rogers who wrote that Harrison was “the foremost Afro-American intellect of his time” and that “none of the Afro-American leaders of his time had a saner and more effective program.” Harrison ranked high among black intellectuals, grappling to understand the workings of racism and building movements to end white supremacy within both the largest class radical movement (the Socialist Party) and, later, the largest race radical New Negro movement (the Universal Negro Improvement Association).

Harrison is the central subject in the first book of a meticulously documented and critically detailed two volume biography by independent scholar and post office labor union activist, now retired, Jeffrey B. Perry, . . . . Perry is well-positioned to write the biography because he preserved and inventoried the Hubert. H. Harrison Papers at Columbia University, and he edited "A Hubert Harrison Reader" (Wesleyan University Press, 2001). He can be proud to have authored the first definitive biography of Harrison and an established point of reference for interested laypersons and scholars for decades to come. . . ." -- Charles L. Lumpkins, Pennsylvania State University, in "Socialism and Democracy," March 2011

Hubert Harrison:
The Voice of
Harlem Radicalism, 1883-1918

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