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Hubert Harrison
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Jeffrey B. Perry Blog

Herb Boyd's Review of
Hubert Harrison: The Voice of Harlem Radicalism, 1883-1918

May 20, 2009

Tags: Herb Boyd, review, Hubert Harrison: The Voice of Harlem Radicalism, 1883-1918, Neworld Review, Baldwin's Harlem, The Harlem Reader, Amsterdam News, One World Today, incomparable intellect, uncompromising integrity, obscurity, independent working class scholarship, history of Harlem, Focus on Harlem, The Voice, charisma, socialism, Barack Obama, legacy, white supremacy, capitalist, prophecy

Herb Boyd


Readers are encourged to look at Herb Boyd’s "Neworld Review" review of "Hubert Harrison: The Voice of Harlem Radicalism, 1883-1918" (see Reviews). Herb Boyd is the author of "Baldwin's Harlem" and "The Harlem Reader," he is a writer and columnist for the "Amsterdam News," and he is managing editor for "One World Today."
Boyd writes, in part:
“[Hubert] Harrison’s incomparable intellect, uncompromising integrity, and the influence he had on the thinkers of his day is gradually emerging from the shadows of obscurity, thanks largely to the yeoman and independent working class scholarship of Jeffrey B. Perry. . . .
Anyone interested in the history of Harlem will find an inexhaustible supply of information in Perry’s chapter “Focus on Harlem.” But it’s hard to single out any one chapter since Harrison’s life was inseparably attached to Harlem where his forums, his paper The Voice, his charisma and his redoubtable socialism made him one of the most compelling men of his times.
Indeed, during those days when he walked the streets of Harlem, or any other part of the city, he was widely acknowledged for his vast storehouse of facts and information, and now through Perry’s prodigious research Harrison’s brilliance can once more engage a generation eager to find inspiration and renewed political spirit.
As the pundits bandy about the possibility we may be living in a post-racial society given the ascendancy of Barack Obama, Perry’s study of Harrison’s life and the redemption of his legacy is never more pertinent than when he writes: “Hubert Harrison understood white supremacy to be central to capitalist rule in the United States.”
Add prophecy to Harrison’s impressive resume."

Hubert Harrison:
The Voice of
Harlem Radicalism, 1883-1918

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